October 17, 2012

By: Luxena Sribaskaran


Summary:
  • Nomenclature – Naming Compounds and Formulas
  • Review for the Test

All of the elements in the periodic table want to obtain a full outer energy level like the noble gases. Metals do this by losing electrons to become positive ions (Cations) while non-metalsdo this by gaining electrons to become negative ions (Anions).

NAMING COMPOUNDS- METAL AND NON-METAL
To name the formula of a metal and a non-metal, you first write down the ion symbol which contains two parts- the number of electrons gained or lost along with a positive or negative sign. Then you look at the [[@#|valences]]. You then do the ‘criss-cross’ rule. This is done by switching the charges of both ions however you use the absolute value.

Ex. Ca(2+) I(1-) = CaI2

Ex. Ni(2+) + O(2-) = Ni2O2 -à These numbers MUST be reduced if they can therefore this turns into NiO.


To write the chemical name, you write the metal and then the non-metal. You then replace the ending of the non-metal with ‘ide”.
Ex. NiO = Nickel Oxide

external image ionform2.jpg
external image ionform2.jpg

NAMES AND FORMULAS FOR ELEMENTS WITH MORE THAN ONE VALENCE (MULTI-VALENCE)
Some metals are able to form more than one kind of ion and therefore have more than one valence. These elements can then create multiple compunds with the same element.

The elements include:




  • Antimony (III) ; Sb3+
  • Antimony (V) ; Sb5+
  • Arsenic (III) ; As3+
  • Arsenic (V) ; As5+
  • Bismuth (III) ; Bi3+
  • Bismuth (V) ; Bi5+
  • Chromium (II) ; Cr2+
  • Chromium (III) ; Cr2+
  • Copper (I) ; Cu+
  • Copper (II) ; Cu2+
  • Gold (I) ; Au+
  • Gold (III) Au3+
  • Iron (II) ; Fe2+
  • Iron (III) ; Fe3+
  • Lead (II) ; Pb2+
  • Lead (IV) ; Pb4+
  • Manganese (II) ; Mn2+
  • Manganese (IV) ; Mn4+
  • Mercury (I) ; Hg+
  • Mercury (II); Hg2+
  • Nickel (II) ; Ni2+
  • Nickel (III) ; Ni3+
  • Phosphorus (III) ; P3+
  • Phosphorus (V) ; P5+
  • [[@#|[[@#|Platinum]]]] (II) ; Pt2+
  • Platinum (IV); Pt4+
  • Tin (II) ; Sn2+
  • Tin (IV) ; Sn4+



Example: If Iron (Fe) were to react with chlorine (Cl) it can happen in different ways. Fe can be either Fe2+ or Fe 3+ so…..

1. Iron ([[@#|[[@#|II]]]]) Chloride = Fe2+ Cl 1- = FeCl2

2. Iron ([[@#|[[@#|III]]]]) Chloride = Fe3+ Cl 1- = FeCl3


Naming Multiple Valence Compounds

Since these compounds are different, they cannot both named the same. In order to do this, follow these steps.
  • Use the reverse criss-cross rule to determine the valence of the metal.
  • Use the name for the metal
  • In brackets put the valence using Roman Numerals.
  • Write the non-metal with the ‘ide’ ending
Example #1: CuCl2 = Cu2+Cl1- = [[@#|[[@#|Copper]]]] (II) Chloride

Example #2: CuO = Cu1X2 O 1X2 = Copper (II) Oxide

Example #3: FeN = Fe1X3 N 1X3 = Iron (III) Nitride

POLYATOMIC COMPOUNDS

Some ionic compounds involve ions which are actually a group of non-metallic atoms bonded together. Such ions are called polyatomic ions and with these ions the charge is distributed over all the atoms.

external image pte-polyatomic-ions.gif
external image pte-polyatomic-ions.gif


Writing Formulas for Polyatomic Compounds
  • Write the symbol of the metal and the polyatomic ion
  • Write the ionic charges or valences above the symbols
  • Crisscross the charges and use as subscripts
  • When there is more than one of the polyatomic ion, put the symbol in brackets and the subscript outside the brackets
  • Make sure the ratio is in lowest terms


Example 1)

Sodium Phosphate

= Na1+Po43-
= Na3 Po4

Example 2)

Magnesium Phosphate

= Mg2+Po43-

= Mg3(Po4) 2



Example 3)

Ammonium Hydroxide

= NH41+OH-
= NH4O
Naming Polyatomic Compounds
  • Write the element name of the metal ion or the positive polyatomic ion first
  • Write the name of the negative polyatomic ion
    EXCEPTION:
  • When the only polyatomic ion is ammonium, remove the ending of the non-metal and add the ‘ide’ instead

Example 1)

Ca(OH) 2 à Calcium Hydroxide

Example 2)
(NH4 ) 2 CO 3 à Ammonium Carbonate

Example 3)
NH4 Clà Ammonium Chloride

Here is a link to help with writing formulas for IONIC compounds.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZKNI907dmE&feature=relmfu


Here is a link to help with naming IONC compounds.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Za1Y_0HM2E&feature=relmfu
NAMES AND FORMULAS FOR MOLECULAR (COVALENT) COMPOUNDS

Greek Prefixes :
1) Mono
2) Di
3) Tri
4) Tetra
5) Penta
6) Hexa
7) Hepta
8) Octa
9) Nona
10) Deca

Writing Formulas for Covalent Compunds
  • Write the symbol of the first element
  • Use the prefix on the first element to determine the subscript of the first element
  • Write the symbol of the second element
  • Use the prefix of the second element to determine the subscript of the second element
    • NEVER reduce subscripts for covalent compounds

Example : Dicarbon Hexahydride à C2 H6

Naming Molecular Compounds
  • Use the subscript of the first element to determine the prefix
  • Attach the prefix to the name of the first element. Mono is not attached to the first element
  • Use the subscript of the second element to determine the prefix for the second element
  • Attach the prefix of the 'ide' form of the second element
Example : CO2 à Carbon Dioxide
BI3 à Boron Triiodide


Homework :
  • Finish up unfinished sheets from class.
  • Page 75 #1
  • Study for test TOMORROW - Recommended questions include ; Pg. 87, Pg 106, Pg 127 # 5,6,7, Pg 128 #6-10, Pg 129 #23,29, 40



October 18, 2012
By: Luxena Sribaskaran


Summary:

Homework: Finish One Page Lab Report on I love Water I love Oil - DUE TOMORROW

Here is a link to the Lab sheet.
http://sch3uking.wikispaces.com/file/view/I+Love+water+I+love+Oilfall2012.pdf

One page lab report is due Friday October 19, 2012; Here is a link to the format.
https://sch3uking.wikispaces.com/file/detail/One+Page+Lab+Report.doc


October 19, 2012

By: Ishaq Rathore

Chemical nomenclature.


Summary:


Pages one and two of chemical nomenclature unit were carried out today.
Naming ionic Compounds the classic way.
Homework:
Pages 3 and 4 of classic/ "ous" and "ic" method if not completed and the front the side of the practice sheet. Homework check will take place, So complete all homework.
Quiz on Monday for naming and writing out the formulas of Binary ionic Compounds. Study page 1- 2 to for the quiz.

Naming Ionic compounds with variable valances the classic way.


This method is used when a multivalent element has two possible valances,

The element ending with "ous" has the lower valence and the element ending with "ic" has the higher valance.

In some cases the ending is not added to the element but to the elements Latin name.

Here is a link showing you the elements that use latin names still to this day,
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/79776616/Variable-Valence-Elements

Some elements have more then two valance values, in that situation use specific values for "ous" and "ic".
e.g Chromium has three valances. Chromium "ous" = 2 "ic" = 3

Here is a link to help with naming the classic way
http://chemistry.about.com/od/nomenclature/a/nomenclature-ionic-compounds.ht


October,22, 2012.

By: Ishaq Rathore

Summary:

pages 3-4 of classic/ " ous" and 'ic" were carried out today.
Acids, binary and oxy acids.

Homework:

complete all of page 7 of acids.

Quiz Tomorrow on naming compounds the classical way. "ous" "ic"
Memorize the 6 oxy acids and their associated radicals and valances.

Acids:

There are three types of acids binary, oxy, and derived oxy acids.
all acids formula begins with hydrogen.

Binary Acids:
1. All have the prefix "Hydro" and end with "ic"
2. All must contain hydrogen as first element.
3. Use the normal cross over rule to determine the formula.
4. All are made by dissolving the gas in water and must be so indicated by using (aq) behind the formula. If the (aq) inst present the formula is a gas by default.
5. Have no oxygen in the formula.

Here a link to show you how to name binary acids:
http://www.ehow.com/how_2316879_name-binary-acids.html

Oxy acids:
larger group of acids. they all contain hydrogen and oxygen and atleast one other non- metal element.
1. the name of the acid ends with "ic"
2. the name of the associated radical ends in "ate"
3. the valance value of the associated radical is equal to the number of acidic hydrogen's in the acid.
4. since the acids are made by reacting non-metal oxide with water,(aq) is not required but may be used.
Note
using the periodic table it is possible to write the names and formulas for a number of other oxy acids using the fact that members of the same chemical family have similar chemical properties. elements of the same chemical family follow the pattern of the associated oxy acids.
Example; Fluoric acid = HFO3
there fore chloric acid = HClO3 and iodic acid = HIO3


Here is a link on how to name oxy acids
http://www.ehow.com/how_2316880_name-oxyacids.html


October,23,2012

By: Ishaq Rathore

Summary:

Quiz on ic and ous was carried out today
Took up page 5,6,7
Derived oxy acids

Homework:

page 8, and 9, also memorize the 6 oxy acids and their associated radical and formulas on page 6.
Quiz tomorrow on poly atomic ions.

Derived oxy acids.

Derived oxy acids all come from the parent oxy acid. in a derived oxy acid the oxygen either losses or gains an atom in the parent acid. in this process the number of hydrogen atoms don't change in the acid and the number of electrons don't change in the radical.


Here is a link to help with naming the oxy acids
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN9VSyq_fE

Here is a table the helps you determine how to name derived oxy acid and how to determine the number of oxygen atoms.

Type of Acid
Assoicated Radical
Examples
Parent Oxy acid + 1 O
Per Ic
Per ate
Perchloic acid HClO4 Perchlorate ion ClO4
Parent oxy acid
ic
ate
chloric acid HClO3 chlorate ion ClO3
Parent Oxy Acid -1 O
ous
ite
Chlorous acid HClO2 chlorite ion ClO2
Parent Oxy acid - 2 O
hypo ous
hypo ite
hypochlorous acid HClO hypochlorite ion ClO
Here is a link to help with derived oxy acids.
http://kitchenerchem.tripod.com/pdffiles/polyions.pdf


October 24, 2012

By: Saraniya Pathmanathan

Summary:
àQuiz on Elements and Polyatomic Ions occurred today
àHomework checkup for pages 8( Derived Oxy Acids) and 9 (Salts from Oxy Acids and Derived Oxy Acids) was completed
àWhat is Acid Radicals?
àStudied the concept of Acid Radicals
àWhat is Diprotic Acid?
àViewed examples of Diprotic Acids
àWhat is acid Salts?
àHomework:
-Complete pages 10 and 11 for Friday
-Quiz on Friday based on Acids and derived Acids Study pages 6-9
Acid Radicals and Acid Salts
What is Acid Radicals?
  • Is formed by the removal of hydrogen ions from an acid.
  • Occurs for certain oxy acids that contain multiple acidic hydrogen’s, which are then able to lose the hydrogen’s one at a time. Resulting in radicals with acidic hydrogen’s still attached.
Acid Radical Concept:
Step 1: H2PO4 à H+ + H2PO4-
Step 2: H2PO4 - à H+ + HPO4-2
Step 3: H2PO4 -2à H+ + PO4-3

Radical
Name
Valence
PO4-3
phosphate
3
HPO4-2
Monohydrogenphosphate
2
H2PO4-
Dihydrogenphosphate
1

What is Diprotic Radicals?
  • The term "diprotic" refers to the fact that the acid can release two hydrogen atoms or form two protons.
  • "Di” refers to the two atoms, that can be released
  • "protic" is used because the atoms that are released are hydrogen’s which contain protons
  • The prefix “Bi” may be used in place of monohydrogen
Ex) HCO3- can be named as bicarbonate or monohydrogen carnbonate
Diprotic Radical Examples:
  1. 1. H2SO4 àHSO4- àBisulphate
  • Sulfuric acid can lose one hydrogen atom to form hydrogen sulfate (HSO4), or lose both hydrogen atoms to form a sulfate ion (SO4-).
  1. 2. H2CO3 àHCO3- àBicarbonate
  • Carbonic acid can lose one hydrogen atom to form hydrogen carbonate (HCO3), or lose both hydrogen atoms to form a carbonate ion (CO3-).
  1. 3. H2CrO4 àHCrO4- àBichromate
  • Chromic acid can lose one hydrogen atom to form hydrogen chromate (HCrO4), or lose both hydrogen atoms to form a chromate ion (CO4-).
  1. 4. H2SiO3 àHSiO3 - àBisilicate
  • Silicic acid can lose one hydrogen atom to form hydrogen silicate (HSiO3), or lose both hydrogen atoms to form a silicate ion(SiO3-).

For further clarification view this Youtube explanation of Diprotic acids, from 0 to 4.07 seconds.



Acid Salts:
  • Are the acid radicals are treated just like any other radical
  • A compound in which a metal ion replaces one or more, but not all of the hydrogen ions in a polyprotic acid.

    • The metal is named first, using its usual element name.
    • One hydrogen remaining = "hydrogen" or the prefix "bi-"
    • Two hydrogens remaining = "dihydrogen"
Concept of Acid Salts
  • Calcium dihydrogenhypophosphite àCa(H2PO2)2
  • Potassium monohydrogen carbonate à KHCO3
  • Aluminum bisulphateà Al(HSO3)3
  • Sodium hydrogensulfate à NaHSO4



Thorough Example:
Calcium dihydrogenphosphite

Ca+2 and H2PO2 à Ca(H2PO2)2 * DO CRISS-CROSS METHOD



October 25, 2012
Nomenclature Practices
By: Ewan Li

As of today we did not have class but remember to always practice and remember the nomenclature we have already learned.
*Attention* Test will be on Thursday November 1
Make sure you know how to name all the nomenclature and remember the acids, polyatomic, common radicals and multivalent elements

Here are some sources to practice them:
http://www.fernbank.edu/Chemistry/nomen.html (is on the top)
http://chemistry.about.com/library/weekly/blcompnamequiz.htm
http://www.funtrivia.com/trivia-quiz/SciTech/Chemical-Nomenclature-Compounds-6838.html (click -> Play: Quiz Game)
http://www.sciencegeek.net/Chemistry/taters/Unit4BinaryNomenclature.htm (Binary Covalent Nomenclature)
http://www.quia.com/quiz/1240133.html
Practice sheets:
http://misterguch.brinkster.net/pra_namingwkshts.html
Tutorials:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwZoYfEGaGs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSbNlne-5P0 (Acids)
MAKE SURE TO PRACTICE BECAUSE PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT!!!!! (this apply to everything else)
The homework for tomorrow will be pages 10 and 11, and for Monday pages 12 and 13


October 26, 2012
Saraniya Pathmanathan
Summary:
àQuiz on Acids, Oxy Acids and Derived Oxy Acids occurred today.
à What are Hydrates?
àStudied the Concept of Hydrates.
àWhat are Peroxides?
àStudied the Concept of Peroxides.
àWhat are Thio Compounds?
àStudied the Concept of Thio Compounds.
àHomework
- Complete pages 12 and 13
- Quiz on Monday based on Acid Radicals and Acid Salts Study Page 11
Understanding of Hydrates, Peroxides and Thio Compounds
What are Hydrates?
  • Crystals containing a given number of water molecules within their structure.
  • When naming a hydrate, Greek prefixes in front of the word hydrate are used to indicate the number of water molecules into the crystal.
Number
Greek Prefix
1
Mono-
2
Di-
3
Tri-
4
Tetra-
5
Penta-
6
Hexa-
7
Hepta-
8
Octa-
9
Nona-
10
Deca-
  • The word “hydrate” is used to describe the water.
  • In the chemical formula the number of water molecules is separated from the formula of the compound by a DOT “.
Concept of Hydrates

Magnesium sulphateheptahydrate

MgSO4 7H2O


For further understanding please watch this YouTube video on Hydrate Compounds.

What are Peroxides?
  • Are binary oxides, which contain an extra oxygen atom.
  • Generally a peroxide has one more oxygen atom than the regular oxide
  • Peroxides are easily recognized by the "per" prefix in the name "peroxide".
àOxide = O-2 And Peroxide= O-
Concept of Peroxides
There are three rules in forming peroxides.
  1. Write the formula of the regular oxide.
  2. Add on one extra oxygen atom
  3. Do not at this stage cancel any of the subscripts ( never reduce subscripts)
Example:
Calcium oxide = Ca+2 0-2 àCaO
Calcium peroxide = CaO2 (you just add 2 oxides)
For further understanding complete this peroxide table.

What are Thio Compounds?
  • The prefix “thio” in the atom indicates that an oxygen atom has been replaced by a sulphur atom.
  • Valence electrons always stay the same.
Thorough Example:
Dithiosulphate = S302-2
Steps to get to “dithiosulphate”.
  1. Sulphate = SO42- (polyatomic ion)
  2. Thiosulphate = S2O3-2 (take an oxygen atom out and add another sulphur atom)
  3. Dithiosulphate= S3O2-2 (Since you are adding 2 sulfur atoms and taking away 2 oxygen atoms the formula name would have a “di” in front of it. Stating that there was an addition and subtraction of 2 atoms of sulphur and oxygen)
Other examples of Thio Compounds




October 29, 2012
Saraniya Pathmanathan

Summary:

àTemporary supply teacher was here for the day.
àWhat are Molecular Compounds?
àConcept of Molecular Compounds.
àHomework:
  • Quiz -On Tuesday based on Acid Radicals& Salts and Hydrates, Peroxides and Thio Compounds * Review pages 11-13*
  • Complete worksheets 15-18
  • Study for Nomenclature Test ( November, 1st , 2012)
Understanding Molecular Compounds
What are Molecular Compounds?
  • Contain two non-metals.
  • Are named by using Greek Prefixes. Which tell how many of each element is present.
Number
Greek Prefix
1
Mono-
2
Di-
3
Tri-
4
Tetra-
5
Penta-
6
Hexa-
7
Hepta-
8
Octa-
9
Nona-
10
Deca-

  • This method does not use the valence values.
  • Name the first element using the element’s full name.
  • The prefix “mono-” is omitted in the first element.
  • The second element contains a prefix and ends with an “ide”, while the first element only contains a prefix, only if there is more than 1 molecule of it.


Thorough Examples :

Diphosphorus pentaoxide: P205
("Di" 2 therefore Phosphorus will have a subscript of 2, and “penta” = 5 therefore Oxygen will have a subscript of 5 and ending with “ide”.)
Carbon monoxide: CO
(since Carbon contains only “1” as its subscript and is the FIRST element, “mono” is not used! Whereas for the second element, Oxygen contains only “1” as its subscript but since it is the SECOND element “mono” is added and will end with “ide”.)
Arsenic trichloride: AsCl3
(Since Arsenic contains only "1" as its subscript and is the FIRST element "mono" is not used! Whereas for the second element "tri" = 3, therefore chlorine contains a subscript of 3 and will end with "ide".)

Xenon tetrafluoride: XeF4
(Since Xenon contains only "1" as its subscript and is the FIRST element "mono" is not used! Whweres for the SECOND element "tetra" = 4, tehrefore fluorine will have a subsrcipt of 4 and will end with "ide".)

For further understanding of the concept of Molecular Compounds, please watch this short YouTube video.

*For more practice complete this worksheet with Naming and Formula Writing of Molecular Compounds.



October 30, 2012

Ewan Li
Summary
  • Had the quiz missed from yesterday on Acid Radicals and Acid Salts
  • Had the quiz from today on Hydrates, Peroxides and Thio Compounds
  • Gotten practice sheets pages: 19,21,22.
  • Gotten new lab sheet : Types of Chemical Reaction
Homework:
  • Having the Molecular Compounds quiz tomorrow
  • Finish all unfinished practice sheets (It will help you alot!)
  • Finish the six pre-lab questions for tomorrow
  • *REMINDER* lab will be on Friday November 2 have the observation table ready
  • *REMINDER* the Nomenclature test will be on Thursday November 1 be prepared
REVIEW
Molecular Compounds
These type of compounds will contain Two Non-Metals and are named using the Greek Prefixes.
This is the only method where the naming will not be effected by the valence values.
The Greek prefix is placed in front of the first and second element.
If there is only one element (SC4) for the first element the prefix is not applied but for the second element it will still apply.
The ending of the second element in the compound will always have the ending of -ide.
If the prefix ends in a- and o- (mono , hepta), and the name of the element starts with a vowel the a- or o- is dropped (Heptoxide).
Here are the prefixes:
Number of atoms
Greek Prefix
1
Mono
2
Di
3
Tri
4
Tetra
5
Penta
6
Hexa
7
Hepta
8
Octa
9
Nona
10
Deca
Examples:
HCl4 = Hydrogen Tetrachloride (monohydrogen tetrachloride) this is not right
Notice how the number of atoms in the second element is four and we use Tetra- in front of the element and the ending of the second element ends with -ide. Also how the first element only have one but we DO NOT put the Greek prefixes there.
F3I7 = Trifluorine Heptiodide
Noticed the number of atoms in the first element is three so we use the Tri- in front of the element and seven for the second element so we used Hepta-. As you can see, the second element starts with a vowel "i" therefore we will drop the a- in Hepta to name it correctly.



Practice Sites:
https://chemistry.twu.edu/tutorial/NamMolCpd.html
http://www.quia.com/quiz/897651.html
http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/story.php?title=chemistry-121-molecular-compounds





Nomenclature Unit Test

November 1, 2012
Viththakan Arunthavanathan

Summary:

  • Completion of the Nomenclature Unit

Overview of the class today:


Today was the day of the nomenclature unit test. The test took the entire period as it was compiled of 40 questions; 20 for writing the formula, and 20 for naming.
This test included of everything thus far in the nomenclature unit such as:
  • Binary compounds
  • Multiple valence elements (Roman numerals & classical naming)
  • Polyatomic Ions
  • HOFBrINCl
  • Acids (Binary, Oxy, and Derived Oxy)
  • Acid Radicals and Acid Salts
  • Hydrates, Peroxides, and Thio Compounds
  • Molecular Compounds

No other lessons were taught today as the test covered the whole hour.

*NOTE - This page should be visited in a few days as the test will be posted with correct answers. This is a great opportunity to go back and check what you did wrong!*


TEST ANSWERS


Although it is posted here, the numbers cannot be in subscript so open this word document to see it in the correct format if you wish:


Chemical Formulas:
  1. HClO2(aq)
  2. Sn(SCN)2
  3. CdO2
  4. Fe(MnO2)2
  5. Hg2Cr2O7
  6. Ar(g)
  7. RbBrO4
  8. PCl3
  9. H2Se(aq)
  10. AuHWO4
  11. Ni2O4
  12. (NH4)2SO4 ● 5H2O
  13. Ag3AsO2
  14. AsH5
  15. HCN(aq)
  16. Bi2O5
  17. Ba(IO)2
  18. ZnMoO3
  19. CoHPO3
  20. XeF4
Chemical names:
  1. Potassium thiocyanate
  2. Lead (IV) thiosulfate
  3. Zinc iodide
  4. Potassium arsenide
  5. Dinitrogen trioxide
  6. Helium
  7. Barium bromite trihydrate
  8. Cesium tungstite
  9. Lithium tellurate
  10. Barium peroxide
  11. Magnesium hyposulfite heptahydrate
  12. Ammonium iodide
  13. Cyanic acid
  14. Nickel (III) thioarsenate
  15. Mercury (II) peroxide
  16. Copper (I) telluride
  17. Zinc hydroxide
  18. Gold (III) fluoride
  19. Strontium peroxide
  20. Silicic acid

JUST BECAUSE IT'S DONE, DOESN'T MEAN YOU FORGET ABOUT IT!

That's right. The concepts in this unit are far too important to put away to the sides just like that. These concepts and skills WILL be re-visited in later tests, quizzes, and exams! Especially in the next chapter/unit, where you will be dealing with types of reactions, which requires you to write compound formulas as well as the names for them.

If nomenclature was not your strongest unit, make sure to keep getting practice with the time you have and seek extra help.
A few links for you to visit and further develop your understanding in this unit are:

Flashcards review: http://quizlet.com/4703226/nomenclature-review-flash-cards/
SparkNotes full review: http://www.sparknotes.com/testprep/books/sat2/chemistry/chapter13.rhtml
Nomenclature basics (video):


Homework:

  • Create and observation table for tomorrow's 'types of reactions' lab
  • Finish up the worksheets on synthesis and decomposition reactions for Monday

Reminders:

  • Try to bring your safety goggles if you own one
  • Don't forget to bring an observation table or else you will not do the lab!
  • Don't miss or be late for class, as you will be doing a lab tomorrow!